Most employees in all probability ought to enter in Medicare part A, which is free for most people and covers institutional care in hospitals and skilled nursing facilities, as well as certain care given by home health agencies and care provided in hospitals. But ask your employer (or your spouse’s employer, if that’s where you get your coverage) whether your current coverage will change in any way if you enroll in Medicare, even just Part A.

Part B Medicare, which cost covers preventative, outpatient care like doctor visits and tests, has a monthly premium that changes each year. It is $104.90 a month in 2016. Individuals who don’t sign up for Part B when they first become eligible can pay a 10 percent premium penalty for each year that enrollment is delayed. However, there is an exception.

Enrolling in Medicare Part B while you are still working depends on the number of people that works for your employer. If your employer has 20 or more employees, you likely would not sign up for Medicare part B right away as a result of your employer’s cluster health arrangement can be the primary underwriter. Once you retire, you may have a special enrollment amount of eight months to sign on for half B, with no penalty.

If your employer has fewer than twenty staffs, however, you ought to enter in Medicare part B once you are initially eligible. Medicare takes care of your basic health needs before your employer’s insurance pays. If you do not enroll, your employer’s health arrangement will not be able to take of this services that Medicare would have. This means that you simply could need to get hold of those services out of your own pocket.

Do I want Medicare Part B while Still Working?

You become eligible for Medicare coverage at age sixty-five, and will typically get Part A hospital coverage free, but the extent to which you need Part B coverage will depend on your employer plan.

Part B covers doctors’ visits and other services and costs a monthly premium of $134 for most 2017 enrollees. People with higher income pay more than this.

If you’re covered by a group health plan through your current job, and your employer has 20 or more employees, then the group plan is generally primary to Medicare—that is, the group plan pays your claims first. If you decide to enroll in Medicare Part B in addition to your group plan, then your doctor can bill Medicare for secondary payment. In that scenario, Medicare solely pays for what it would ordinarily without affecting the primary arrangement.

Eligibility of socio-economic class individuals turning sixty-five

  • You (or your spouse) are currently employed.
  • You’re covered by an employer or union group health plan based on that employment.

If your employer doesn’t require you to sign up for Medicare right away, you can sign up later during a Special Enrollment Period without a late enrollment penalty.

You’re covered by an employer or union group health plan (with at least 100 employees) based on that employment.

Eligibility of socio-economic class individuals over sixty-five

  • You (or your spouse) are currently employed
  • You are covered by an employer or union group health plan based on that employment.

When you eventually retire, you will be able to sign up for Medicare during a Special Enrollment Period without having to pay any late enrollment penalty.

Eligibility of working class people with disability and under 65

  • You or your spouse is working.
  • You are covered by an employer or union group health plan based on that employment.

When you retire eventually, you will be able to sign up for Medicare during a Special Enrollment Period without having to pay any late enrollment penalty.

Bottom line is that all working class people turning 65 or above 65 are qualified to apply for Medicare. They can sign up for Medicare part A free.  However, their enrollments for the Medicare part B depends on the number of employees in the organization they work and if the health insurance scheme of the organization can take care of their Medicare part B.